Ted Clements

PDQ issues applicable across all PDQ Yachts (or if you can't find a place for something, it probably belongs here for now)
Timothyamoll
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Ted Clements

Postby Timothyamoll » Fri Sep 15, 2017 7:53 am

Good morning ,
Does anyone have contact info or direct email for Ted Clements who did most of the engineering on the PDQ 32. We would like to build a bow sprit for a code O this winter and Steve Killing pointed me in Ted's direction
Thanks
Tim

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thinwater
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Re: Ted Clements

Postby thinwater » Sat Sep 16, 2017 12:06 am

I can see why. It's easy for an engineer to estimate the forces on the tack, but the compression force aft on the forward beam is going to be substantial, depending on the design of the code zero. In general, cats designed for sprits have a compression strut from the mid point of the beam to the bridge deck, which the PDQ 32 does not have. This turns it into a complex rigging question.

I would also consider whether the pole will be getting planted in to waves when beating into heavy seas vs. folding. I've certainly seen the bows dig in a few times, and having a pole up there would complicate that. That said, there are some nifty solutions to folding.

Do you already have a chute and genoa? One reason I was not very interested in a code zero is that it is only useful in a rather apparent wind range. If the AP is forward of about 50 degrees you are better off with the genoa (which you really need to windward anyway), and with the AW after of ~ 110 degrees a full chute that can be moved to windward with a bridle projects far more area than a code zero on a sprit. A performance cat can carry a code zero deep, but the PDQ 32 may be better served by a fat spinnaker. Of course, this depends on where and how you sail. I seem to spend a lot of windward/leeward time. Reaching is different.

I'm sure it is a gas with the AW 60-80 degrees. Good luck!
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Re: Ted Clements

Postby thinwater » Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:47 am

No responses? I assume you are aware he went with Antares and is probably still there.

I like the Antares 44 design, scaled down, for the PDQ32. I actually ran through the math (I'm an engnieer) and was considering it, but it didn't make sense to me with the sails and rigging mods I have. But it would have gone like this:

* Strut from new pad with gusset on forward beam to reinforced location on front of bridge deck. The aft force from a code zero is too much for the forward beam. Clevis mounted at both ends to keep the compression load determinate.
* Relatively short sprit, perhaps 4 feet. I don't want to be planting it in waves, and more weight is more pitching up wind. I was thinking of using a beach cat mast I have.
* Similar rigging. I have a sprit with the tack line mounted on the sprit like that on another boat, as below, and I liked it. Kept everything together.
* Spinnaker track across the front beam and and small tackle for retracting. This keeps the water stays tight. Also reinforces the beam against the compression force.

Very doable, just not a project I went forward with. I decided to stretch the transoms instead. Better yet... do both!

Image
Writing full time since 2014.

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"Keeping a Cruising Boat for Peanuts"
"Singlehanded Sailing for the Coastal Sailor"
"Faster Cruising for the Coastal Sailor"

Timothyamoll
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Re: Ted Clements

Postby Timothyamoll » Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:24 pm

Thanks Thinwater for you input. Ted has a blogg on the Antares web site, suppose I can comment there. I'm a boat builder / fabricator / boatyard manager so building things isn't an issue. Just want to make sure we don't break the boat. The boat is hull number 48 and is about ready for new tramps. I thought about building a glass / carbon re enforced box beam for a compression post front beam to bridge deck and then add a pole out front as your picture shows. I could have new tramps made to fit the new beam. The arrangement I like better is more like what the Gunboats use with a under slung pole going all the way back to a socket in the bridge deck. An aluminum or SS bale fitting could be built to hold the pole centered on the front beam.
We sail on cape cod bay and buzzards bay , plenty of reaching and breeze in the afternoon. I really like the top down furlers and would love to hoist the big sail and leave it rigged for a few days. I realize this isn't a cheap date but would be lots of fun if done right. I'll keep looking for Ted.
Cheers
Tim
" 2 Katie's"
PDQ 32- 48

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Re: Ted Clements

Postby thinwater » Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:09 am

A box beam could be strong, but if there is any flexing at all, it will want to crack at the bridgedeck end and fatigue. This is why many members in truss bridges are pinned at junctions rather than welded or bolted. That is one reason I was thinking pinned. Of course, this boat does not flex much, but in really heavy going (30 knots, pounding into steep 6-foot walls of water) I'm sure it does.

The problem with underslung is the bows on the PDQ 32 are not very high. The pole would be rather close to the water and that much more likely to pierce waves. At least that has been my experience in steep waves. Additionally, it could not be retracted, which may not matter at all. Of course, you said you would have a socket on the front beam.

I like the one-piece tramp. It's more comfortable for guests lounging.This is another reason I was considering a strut running below the tramp. Lounging on the tramp, in the shade of the chute, is a real catamaran luxury. You're going to love it.

Many of these are just opinions, based on my use and my vission. Everything you suggested would work, it just was not the way I envisioned it.
Writing full time since 2014.

http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/2017/ ... store.html
"Keeping a Cruising Boat for Peanuts"
"Singlehanded Sailing for the Coastal Sailor"
"Faster Cruising for the Coastal Sailor"


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